January, 2012

Free ART Tuesdays extended through February!

January 27, 2012

Here is your chance to experience an ART treatment for FREE!  Maybe you’ve heard about Active Release Techniques but haven’t gone for it and signed up for any treatments.  Perhaps this is your first time hearing of ART, and you have nagging shoulder, wrist, knee, or foot pain.  Either way, take advantage of this opportunity.  For a limited time, I’m offering free ART sessions on Tuesday afternoons.  I would love to sit down with you, discuss your injury or issue, and then provide you with some soft tissue treatment.   ART is a great method to both diagnose and treat soft tissue conditions (carpal tunnel, swimmer’s shoulder, rotator cuff problems, plantar fasciitis, just to name a few).  For more information about the technique please visit http://www.activerelease.com/what_patients.asp   To sign up with me, please schedule your free appointment through our website:   http://www.genbook.com/bookings/slot/reservation/30050141?bookingSourceId=1000   Click on “new patient,” then select Dr. Sandy Baird.  Choose any Tuesday in February, and then please enter ART Tuesdays in the memo field.  Spaces are limited so sign up soon if you’re interested.   Details: For new patients only.  Appointments must be scheduled with Dr. Sandy Baird.  One free appointment per person.  24 hour cancelation notice applies.
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Athlete’s Seminar Series is Back!

January 24, 2012

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Tuesday, February 7th at 7pm (free) Do you experience pain, tingling, or numbness in your hands after working at the computer for long periods of time? Do you have a friend or family member who has told you they have carpal tunnel syndrome. This lecture will help you gain a better understanding of carpal tunnel syndrome and related overuse injuries. What most people think of when they hear “carpal tunnel” isn’t necessarily a problem with the wrist. The following topics will be addressed: * What is carpal tunnel syndrome? * Other injuries that can mimic the symptoms of carpal tunnel. * How to tell if you have true carpal tunnel syndrome. * How you can prevent carpal tunnel and other injuries. * Why surgery isn’t always the most appropriate treatment. * What to do if you start feeling the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Please RSVP to drsandy@innersport.com. ______________________________________________________________________________________

Nutrition for Peak Performance

Tuesday, February 21th at 7pm (free) You can have the perfect biomechanics, optimal skeletal alignment, and the strongest muscles in the world, but if you are not taking in the right fuel, you’re leaving your body prone to fatigue (which is one of the most common causes of soft tissue injuries.) Attend this lecture to learn what foods to eat and which foods to avoid. We’ll discuss the role of protein, fats, and carbohydrates in the diet, and we’ll talk about optimal timing for consuming each of them. We’ll offer suggestions for preparing quick, healthful snacks that you can throw in your bag at the beginning of a busy day, and you may even leave with a few new delicious recipes to try!

Please RSVP to drsandy@innersport.com. ______________________________________________________________________________________

Self Care for Yoga Practitioners

Date: tbd Content:   tbd ______________________________________________________________________________________
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Free ART Treatment Tuesdays!!!

January 12, 2012

Free ART Treatment Tuesdays!!!   Here is your chance to experience an ART treatment for FREE!  Maybe you've heard about Active Release Techniques but haven't gone for it and signed up for any treatments.  Perhaps this is your first time hearing of ART, and you have nagging shoulder, wrist, knee, or foot pain.  Either way, take advantage of this opportunity.  For a limited time, I'm offering free ART sessions on Tuesday afternoons.  I would love to sit down with you, discuss your injury or issue, and then provide you with some soft tissue treatment.   ART is a great method to both diagnose and treat soft tissue conditions (carpal tunnel, swimmer's shoulder, rotator cuff problems, plantar fasciitis, just to name a few).  For more information about the technique please visit http://www.activerelease.com/what_patients.asp   To sign up with me, please schedule your free appointment through our website:   http://www.genbook.com/bookings/slot/reservation/30050141?bookingSourceId=1000   Click on "new patient," then select Dr. Sandy Baird.  Choose either Tuesday the 17th or the 24th, and then please enter ART Tuesdays in the memo field.  Spaces are limited so sign up soon if you're interested.   Details: For new patients only.  Appointments must be scheduled with Dr. Sandy Baird.  One free appointment per person.  24 hour cancelation notice applies.
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What to Expect with Disc Injuries

January 6, 2012

Disc Injuries What are intervertebral discs?   In between each of our spinal bones (vertebra) are discs that act as shock absorbers and keep the vertebrae separated, allowing them to move properly.  These intervertebral discs are made up of an inner and an outer layer.  The outer layer, the annulus fibrosus, consists of many layers of fibrocartilage, which distribute pressure across the disc.  The inner layer, the nucleus pulposus, contains a gel-like fluid with loose fibers floating in it.  It is similar to a jelly donut.  The annulus fibrosus is the delicious, sweet doughy pastry shell, and the nucleus pulposus is the sticky red jelly that inevitably ends up all over your shirt.   What causes a disc injury (herniation)?   When you bite into the front of that donut, the jelly gets forced to the back of the donut.  With a strong enough bite, or repeated small bites, the jelly is forced to the outside of the donut.  Taking a big bite out of a donut is analogous to undergoing major trauma to the spine (car crash, sports collision, etc.)  Taking many small bites is equivalent to experiencing a series of microtraumas to the spine (the damaging “flexed” position typical of poor posture, the repetitive motions of typing, etc.)  The microtraumas accumulate over months to years and can cause the disc to degenerate.  Aging, poor nutrition (such as eating too many donuts!), and chronic smoking also factor into determining the extent of disc degeneration.  The pain associated with a disc injury comes partially from the mechanical irritation of the “jelly” squeezing it’s way out of the disc and into the epidural space, where it presses on delicate nerve roots.  Further pain is caused because the “jelly” contains chemical irritants called cytokines, which cause inflammation and irritation of the nerve structures in the area.   What should I expect?   The pain associated with a disc injury may start slowly, and may get worse after standing or sitting, when bending backwards, or when coughing, sneezing, or laughing.  The most common area for a disc injury is the lower back.  You may have sharp pain in the leg, hip, or butt.  There may also be pain, tingling, or numbness below your knee or into your foot.  This is commonly referred to as sciatica.  A disc injury in your neck may result in pain upon moving the neck, pain in your shoulder, arm, and sometimes into the fingers.  Some disc injuries also result in muscle weakness in the involved areas.  Your symptoms will likely resolve in weeks to months.  Most cases resolve without surgery, but there are instances when a patient elects to have surgery so that they can get out of pain faster.  You will need to notify your doctor immediately if you notice progressive muscle weakness, numbness or tingling in your genital or anal area, or loss of bowel or bladder function.   What to do about it?   To allow a disc injury to heal, we need to remove the damaging stimulus.  This may mean avoiding certain postures, lifting lighter loads, and bracing your core before making sudden movements.  As soon as you are able, you should return to your normal activities unless they aggravate your pain.  Avoid sitting for long periods of time without taking a break, bending, and twisting.  As soon as you injure a disc, apply ice to the painful area for twenty minutes every two hours.  After three days, you can start to use a heat pack for twenty minutes every two hours to reduce muscle spasms and increase circulation.  Therapies such as ART, Garston, and chiropractic manipulation can be useful to address soft tissue restrictions in the damaged tissues.  Depending on the individual and the extent of the injury, your doctor can come up with the most appropriate treatment plan for you.  Once the healing process is underway, these manual therapies can be combined with exercises to further rehabilitate your injury.  These exercises are designed to strengthen the muscles in the injured area, as well as balance out different muscle groups so that the spine will be under minimal stress.
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