Art Show

September 6, 2012 | by Dr. Jess

Please join Innersport on Sept. 15th at 8PM at Blow Salon for Dr. Jess' first art show.  Joining Dr. Jess will be longtime friend and photography buddy Nancy Holliday. Jil at Blow Salon always puts on a great show with yummy food, beer from Triple Rock, wine, and music from members of the Berkeley High Jazz Club.

Details

Where:   Blow Salon:  2112 Berkeley Way, Berkeley (between Oxford and Shattuck)

When:    Sept. 15th at 8PM

Who:      Jessica Greaux, Nancy Holliday and others

What:    Landscape and nature photography

 

About Dr. Jess' Photography

“Nature is a haunted house–but Art–is a house that tries to be haunted.”  - Emily Dickinson

Growing up, I had a couple acres of woods in my backyard to play, explore, dream, imagine, and pretend.  I created bike jumps, swung from trees, crossed logs over a stream (more like a chronic puddle), and hiked trails the dogs created through the pines, birch, and other trees I could not name.

Life brought me indoors for most of my professional career, running a business and healing the injured.  I love what I do and feel blessed I have a wonderful team and amazing clients.  Fortunately, the Bay Area is one big playground for athletes, outdoor enthusiasts, and those inspired by nature’s gifts.

Photography allows me to explore the beauty of the little and big things in life, as cliche as that may sound.  I get lost.  Just like I did in my backyard.  Just me, the camera, and the beauty I walk on, in, around, over, under, through, and above.

For this art show, Dr. Jess has printed several of her photos on aluminum.  Why aluminum?   Well, you have to see it to believe it.  The color POPS off the print- vibrant, shiny, and almost 3D like.  Not only is it beautiful, it will last a very, very long time since it's not printed on paper, which can fade over time.  Paper also can become destroyed easily either by tears or water.  Aluminum doesn't rust and is sturdy.   One benefit of aluminum is it holds up well outdoors.  The aluminum prints also can be mounted so they look like they are floating off the wall which is a nice visual effect, or can be framed.  Visit the art show to see samples of both.               Nancy Holliday introduced Dr. Jess to Infrared Photography and now she is hooked.  To learn more about Infrared Photography, see below.

About Nancy Holliday's Photography

These encaustic pieces start with an infrared photograph that is printed onto a clear film and then transfered onto mulberry paper.  It is then either dipped in wax and hung (flower) or adhered to a frame board with layers of wax.  The added color is composed of a combination of indian spices given the image an interesting border and avoiding the cadmium in colored wax sticks.  Once dried, the piece is buffed with an old nylon stocking to increase the clarity and add a bit of shine.

Nancy's photography is not only spectacular, she adds a creative twist using a waxing technique called "encaustic".  She has successfully printed on rice paper and silk and other unique papers, then dipping them into wax.  Other fine photos have appeared on aluminum as well.  You will not only be impressed with her point of views, but her creative printing and mounting techniques give her her own unique style rarely seen at other shows.  You can also find her photography and art pieces at Cake Tahoe and Riverside Studio in Downtown Truckee on Donner Pass Road.  Worth mentioning is that every piece she creates is unique, no two of her encaustic pieces are alike.  They are one of a kind.              

About Infrared Photography

From LifePixel.com

Digital imaging sensors in most cases are just as sensitive to infrared light as to visible light. Camera manufacturers stop infrared light from contaminating the images by placing a hot mirror filter in front of the sensor which blocks the infrared part of the spectrum while still allowing the visible light to pass.

This hot mirror filter is removed and then replaced with an infrared or clear filter.  Now the camera can see infrared light, which our eyes cannot see.  The resulting image shows foliage to be almost white and the sky can look amber.  These make great black and white photos as you will see at the art show.  Here are some sample infrared images taken by Dr. Jess.  To learn more about Infrared Photography, visit LifePixel's website at www.lifepixel.com.  For more examples, click here.           
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